How to Rig Gang Hooks For Fishing Live Bait Under a Float

In this article I will outline how to rig a set of gang hooks for fishing under a float. Two of the popular and effective fishing baits are live worms and live minnows and gang hooks are the most effective way to rig these live baits for fishing, especially when fishing under a float. For those of you who don’t know, gang hooks are a pair of small hooks tied back to back on a leader and used for fishing various live baits.

When fishing with a float, which of course is another name for a bobber, the best types of floats to use are slip bobbers. Slip bobbers made from balsa wood are the most buoyant and effective fishing floats. Slip bobbers slip through your line and “float freely” on your line. A bobber stop (which is a small piece of rubber) is then added to your line to stop the bobber from “slipping” beyond it. This bobber stop can be adjusted by the angler, so you have complete control over the depth that your bait is below the float. This makes float fishing much more precise, and in almost all fishing situations where a float of any kind is used, a slip bobber is the way to go.

With that being said let’s get down to the business of how to rig gang hooks for fishing live bait under a float, what do you say? For this example I’m going to assume that a slip bobber is being employed. If you are using another type of float these principles still hold true and I’m sure you can adjust these ideas to your particular type of float as needed.

Begin by grabbing the end of you line and slipping your bobber onto the line. Now add the bobber stop to your line. At this point tie a small swivel to the line. The swivel will not only help to prevent line twist, but will also make a strong union between your line and the set of gang hooks. At this point a set of pre-tied gang hooks is added to the opposite end of the swivel. Now, depending on the depth of the water you intend to fish, current flow (if there is any), and wind conditions, a split shot sinker or two may need to be added to your line to help the bait to sink in the water. Adding split shots to the line is a judgment call and is completely up to personal fishing conditions.

At this point your bait needs to be added to the gang hooks. If minnows are your bait of choice, simply hook the minnow through the lips on the top of the two hooks and allow the second hook to “hang freely”. If worms are being used as bait, rig the worm onto the gang hooks outstretched (as I’m sure you can imagine). In the case of large worms such as night crawlers the worm should be pinched in half before being rigged on the gang hooks so that a large portion of the worm isn’t “hanging free” off of the second hook in the water.

The bobber stop now needs to be adjusted to the depth you would like your bait to be below the float and you are good to go. Now you know how to rig gang hooks for fishing live bait under a float so it’s time to get out there and start catching some fish.