Biker Business….

With motorcycle gang violence again under scrutiny, it’s worth remembering an ominous warning about a biker blueprint for consolidating and carving up territory amongst the strongest clubs to maximise illicit incomes.

The warning was contained in a confidential assessment prepared in New Zealand on the activities of the Bandidos and the Highway 61 club and an agreement between Australian motorcycle gangs.

Bandidos chapter president Rodney Monk was gunned down outside an East Sydney restaurant on Thursday night in what appears to have been an internal club dispute. Police are hunting former Banidos sergeant-at-arms Russell Oldham in connection with the killing. Monk has since been named as a cocaine “broker” with links to an organised drug syndicate.

And on Saturday three members of the Highway 61 gang were arrested in Adelaide over the blackmail and bashing of a local man who owed money for drugs. The men were arrested at Adelaide airport after flying in from Sydney, allegedly to further threaten the victim. Two of the bikies were travelling under false identities.

Acting Detective Superintendent Graham Goodwin said after the arrests that such violence was become more common amongst bikie gangs.

“We are becoming increasingly aware that members of motorcycle gangs and their associates are threatening and extorting members of the community to obtain money and other assets,” he said.

In the document called “A Preliminary Report on the Bandidos Motor Cycle Club Merging with the New Zealand Highway 61 Motor Cycle Club” prepared by New Zealand police in 1996, details were given of plans by international biker gangs to drastically reduce the number of outlaw motor clubs proliferating world-wide.

“This [move] began in America where most motor cycle initiatives appear to begin, and through the reaches of the empire of the strong gangs, such as the Hell’s Angels and Outlaws, spread to Europe through their associated chapters and affiliated groups, and then to other countries of the world,” the report said.

“The reasoning behind the activity was to limit and control the amount of competition for the shrinking dollar in the illicit trading arena such as the drugs market, and to strengthen the financial position of the major corporation players.

“…where minor gang entities exist, they were either to be chartered (taken over) or absorbed by takeover, or eliminated completely, often through extreme violence, [including] homicide through shootings and bombings.

“In early 1994, following the world trend, there was a meeting in Sydney, Australia, between the major gangs where it was decided informally that the gangs in that country would adopt a similar stance to that already being set up by the rest of the [multinational] gang business world-wide.

“There would be a maximum of six gangs controlling Australia by the year 2000.”

Under what was dubbed the “Australia 2000 Pact” the six gangs that would dominate were the Hell’s Angels, Outlaws, Bandidos, Rebels, Black Uhlans and Nomads.

The contents of the confidential report were revealed to the SA parliament on July 2, 1996 amid growing fears in that state of motorcycle gang violence.

The SA parliament was told that the confidential report detailed how New Zealand bikies had links to Australian gangs involved in trading and selling illegal weapons.

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